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Shine a light

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Woo hoo! We have several working lights in the upstairs kitchen now, and one even has a light fixture. Progress, baby.

John’s cutting tile, so I’m taking a quick break from our kitchen-floor-laying project to shine a light on a few things on my mind, good and bad.

First I’d like to stress how sick I am of hearing our do-nothing Congress refer to President Obama as a “lame duck.” He is still the duly elected president, popular enough to be elected twice and one whom people will see in retrospect as one of the most effective ever. “Lame duck” refers to an office-holder after his replacement has been elected, which for Obama won’t be until November. Even then, he’ll still be the president with full presidential powers. #DoYourJob #SCOTUS

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I’m just dropping this in because it’s so cute and makes me think of the Beatles (“Fixing a Hole) – and Paul McCartney, whom Liz, Brent, Jude and I will go see next month.

Second, February was frighteningly warm, as far as damage to our planet goes. We’re rapidly passing the point of no return. Between that and the hideous insanity of the (much-too-long) election cycle, this grandmother has a hard time going to sleep at night. And I feel guilty; I faithfully did my Climate Reality training last September and have written letters, signed petitions, etc., but I still haven’t done any official presentations, partly because life gets in the way but mainly from reality paralysis. I’ll get out there at some point. Climate change is fact, a devastating one, not a belief system. I wish people would wake up to that.

I might as well mention how much our AT&T Uverse sucks. Our internet service cuts out all day and night sometimes cycling on and off every few seconds. Even the television service is starting to go off and onand pixelate/freeze. Makes it really hard to do anything online consistently, so it’s looking like we’ll have to go back to Comcast. But I won’t get started on monopolies/mega-corporations.

In a scary note, I mailed John’s last Capital One payment Feb. 24 – took it to the post office as always. Capital One received it yesterday (!), so the bill we got today showed a late fee and interest. I pay early in full every month for both our cards and have for years. Bad post office! Fortunately, all it took was one call to Capital One – I think the understanding woman I talked to was Sharla (I wish I’d written that down);t she was great. She looked at our record, removed the charges and fees, and put a note in about what had happened. She also said Capital One has seen a lot of problems with late mail recently.

We try to support the post office and make most of our payments the old-fashioned way, but good grief.

I’d also like to shine a light on other recent good customer service. First, we got all the tile for our upstairs at The Tile Shop on Rodney Parham. Kudos to Samatha Wicker, who helped and advised us. We’re happy campers, if a bit sore.

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The beginning of the quartzite kitchen floor. Zuzu is an obstacle to be worked around much of the time, but at this point, she’s banned from the room, which she just can’t believe. She’s so big, one wrong step scoots tiles out of place before they’re dry.

I’d also like to call attention to Doug Crawford at Ferguson’s furniture store in Benton. John wanted to drive out to look at the Stressless floor model sale, and damned if Doug didn’t make us an offer we couldn’t – and didn’t want to – refuse. If you go see him, tell him Laura and John Hardy sent you. He’ll do you up right.

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Our new Stressless sectional is under wraps to protect it from construction dust, but as soon as it’s safe to uncover it and put it together, I’ll show you what it looks like.

The new black couch will sit near the new kitchen – it’s going to look fab.

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Starting to look like a floor!

Lordy, just took a break from this to go lay more tile. We do pretty well for a guy who’ll be 65 in a month and a 60-year-old lady, though my legs are quivery. But we’re almost there. We haven’t argued once – not even when the tiles, which are hand cut and don’t all match in thickness, have to be taken out and adjusted.

We make a good team. And I’d forgotten how big the room is.

Speaking of teams, it’s time to get ready for Annabelle’s second micro-soccer game – I’ll pick Mother up on the way, and after that we’ll go to the visitation for an old family friend, from way back when Cathy and I were little girls. Cycle of life goes on and on.

Tell next time. I’ll end with a few more photos.

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Our favorite obstacles – and two of the reasons we went with tough natural stone for the floors. Tess (back to camera) doesn’t make too many trips upstairs these days, though. She and Mother are age cohorts.

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Since I’m usually behind the camera, this is just for proof that I do help. This was a trial fitting of our stove – it fits and works!

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And proof once again that the little things – like top door facings – make a big difference. John made them, of course.

And now it’s 2016 …

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Practicing on my late friend Franchelle Owen’s Wurlitzer piano, which is tucked into our foyer now, is one way I’ll be spending time in 2016. 

Four days into a new year, almost four months into my 60s and about four weeks since I last touched The Lolly Diaries. Time gets away.

But making better use of my time is one of my intentions for this new year. I don’t make resolutions – too stern a word for me and a recipe for failure for many. We need to be kind to ourselves and do the best we can.

Unless we need someone to (metaphorically) crack a whip to keep us going  – sometimes that’s called for, too. And I’ve been known to employ the “fake it until you make it” method repeatedly in my 60 years. Whatever works. We must progress.

Speaking of progress, or, really, lack thereof until now, I also intend to get my ass in gear with the Climate Reality talks. John gave me some no-excuses Christmas gifts – a projector, projector stand and really big portable screen. Seems like eons ago that I was in Miami for training, but only three highly eventful months have passed.

Many, many years have passed since I’ve parked my ass on a piano bench to practice, much less play, but it’s coming back, albeit slowly. I’m so grateful to have a piano to practice on – and I’m very pleased that it belonged to my friend Rhonda’s mother. That makes me smile.

Another thing that makes me smile is that John and I have resumed work on the upstairs. (Hooray!!) Right now it’s him – I don’t build cabinets or do wiring – but we have tile to lay (once we can agree on which tile) and will have cabinets to paint. I’ll share photos, of course.

One last thing for the hopping-back-in-the-saddle post: We kept the youngest grandchild this weekend while the big kids went to the Liberty Bowl (Woo, Pig!). He was a delight and was delighted when we pulled out his big brother’s little Thomas the Tank Engine inflatable bed that I found somewhere about seven years ago.

Probably not as excited as Tess, though. She remembered the tiny bed well and couldn’t wait to join Silas. When I gave him the giant fluffy bear Pop bought for Jude all those years ago, Tess ran and got her giant fluffy stuffed dog and plopped down on the bottom half of the bed.

The wee one was asleep within minutes, all warm and cozy with his bedmate. He even slept through both dogs howling (Tess had moved to her own bed just past the foot of Thomas by then, but Zuzu stood right beside him) when sirens and flashing lights went off at 2:20 a.m.

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Tess is still cuddling her stuffed toy a couple of hours after Silas crashed. I did tuck him back in before we left the room, and at the 2:20 howling, he was still nestled tight.

Such is life downtown.

Here’s to 2016. Let’s make it count.

Help put the brakes on the climate change train

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Don’t know what happened to my “Bridge Out” poster from the ’70s.

A couple of times lately, Mother has brought up a poster I had in my room as an older teen. Though she was slightly mortified when guests in our home saw it, she didn’t make me take it down – and now she wishes we still had it.

Just last Sunday she said it seemed to perfectly sum up the state of the world. She’s getting pretty hip at 80.

I’ve actually been trying to find a copy of that poster to buy for years now. My Beatles 10th anniversary poster turned up in the attic about 25 years ago, but my understated “Oh, shit” and my “Overpopulation” poster by surrealist artist John Pitre have vanished.

I did re-buy an old copy of “Overpopulation” on eBay, at 10 times what I paid at Peaches Records for my original – it and “Bridge Out” each cost $3.50, back then, if I remember correctly. “Overpopulation” is a scary, dystopian image, as you can see below, but you can also see where my mind was at 18 or so. I’ve been concerned about the state of the world for a long time.

We’re past the tipping point with climate change – and getting there with population, the great elephant in the room no one wants to address anymore. (Remember zero population growth, baby boomers? We used to talk openly about such things.)

We still need to reduce, reuse, recycle, compost, etc., etc., but the problem is so much bigger than we regular folks can solve.

The guys standing around the train are the ones who have to get with the program. We can do our part by voting climate change deniers out of office. We can put pressure on governments via marches and protests. We can educate ourselves, support and demand clean energy, write letters to the editor, boycott Koch Brothers products. But our leaders are going to have to get us on the right track.Letter to Ed 1

If you don’t know who the Koch Brothers are or why you should care, please read this article. http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/01/27/381954047/koch-brothers-put-price-tag-on-2016-889-million

It tells you much more, but in a nutshell, the Koch Brothers fund bogus climate “science,” corrupt politicians with money, and work to change the face of American politics – and America – in a  most horrific way.

I can tell you, also in a nutshell, to vote against them with your shopping habits – avoiding any Georgia-Pacific products, Chevron, Union and Conoco gasoline is a start, but a comprehensive list of their holdings is mind-boggling.

Let me refer you to this well-written post from “The Fifth Column” blog – you’ll find more info on the Kochs and a long list of their products.

http://kstreet607.com/2011/02/23/boycott-koch-industry-products/

Climate reality is grim, but I choose to remain optimistic. We can and must still do our part with our daily habits and actions, the topic for next time.

6thBut in the meantime, you might want to start reading The Sixth Extinction, if you haven’t. I highly recommend it, whether you’re just jumping on the climate-reality train or you’ve been blowing its whistle for years

 

 

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Can I hang this without scaring the grandkids?

Breathe deeply and carry on

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The begonia on the top left is the offspring of the one in the kitchen. The little fern next to her has one baby in the kitchen. The beauties on the seat are fairly new family members – both have purple on the back of their leaves,which made them must-haves, of course. (They also called my name ever-so politely and said they needed homes.) The little antique school desk is one Mother may or may not have used at her elementary school in Russellville, but that’s definitely from whence it came.

Last Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, obviously did not turn out the way we expected.

climate realityAs a new graduate of The Climate Reality Project’s leadership training, one of my early actions (I haven’t done a presentation yet) was holding a “24 Hours of Reality” live-streaming watch party. I’d been streaming since 11 a.m. and hadn’t heard any news all day.

Susan, who arrived early, had just left for home, and Cai, Julia, John and I were watching and waiting on others to arrive when a visibly shaken Al Gore interrupted the broadcast to cancel the event in light of what had happened and in solidarity with Paris (where the “24 Hours of Reality” event was based).

We quickly switched to regular television to find out what had happened – sickening news – and I got busy telling people on their way or who were planning to come the next morning not to come after all.

We had to cancel our party and Climate Reality had to cancel the event, but as disgusting, evil  and vile as the actions of the misguided murderous gang was, and as much as the rest of their gang hopes to frighten the rest of us, we can’t live in fear. We can’t let them win.

The same is true for climate change – the reality is frightening, but we must do what we can to change things, adapt as best we can to our new reality, and keep going. Doing nothing to make a difference is the scariest possibility.

But we’ll save that for another time. Today I want to focus on something soothing, at least for me: functional beauty in the form of houseplants. The function is cleaning the air indoors, and the beauty is obvious. Yes, they take a little love and grooming, and some of the ferns can be as messy as house pets, but love them and they’ll reward you. And love you back.

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The ficus just came back in from the back deck. Her sister, an elderly schefflera arbicola Trinnette,  has an allergy to aphids which requires her to live indoors all year. I think they’re happy to be reunited.

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The poor scraggly fern and the philodendrons live in the bathroom all year, but the feisty younger fern, who was split off from her bedraggled mother last year, just came in from the deck.

Houseplants have been a big part of my life since I turned 18, and that was a long, long time ago. They’re good for my soul and good for our lungs. They’re also a commitment – I always leave detailed instructions for their care when we travel – and I can’t help but grieve a bit when one goes belly up, as happens at times. But I can’t imagine living without them.

Speaking of travel, if you do, please don’t stop. Please don’t live in fear. That’s not living at all.

Paris, je t’aime.IMG_1643_2